Resilient Cultivators

25% of Kenya | 7.4 million people

Social, trusting,

planning-oriented

Click below to learn more:

Watch Marion's

Short Documentary

MARION'S STORY

Meet Marion

 

“There are no times we keep

our hands empty – we plant.”

Marion is a 49 year old mother of two whose family generates its income from farming fruits and vegetables, growing and harvesting tea, two dairy cows, two chickens, and several goats, as well as from Marion’s small businesses of four years selling groceries and clothing from a stall in a building she rents monthly in the center of her small town outside Limuru. Marion has one daughter in primary school and another who just graduated university. She hopes to soon find business picking up enough that she can afford to save with the local women’s sacco and procure a loan there with which she can invest anew in her small business in town. Marion’s goals are straightforward: “To work hard and go on to a higher height.” Yet her aspirations are also social. Marion is a profoundly relational kind of independent. “If I don’t have my children, all this work would be for what? I do it to have a family.”

Besides working as a farmer and running a small-scale trade business, what other financial decisions have Marion made to afford big expenses such as her daughters’ education?

 
 

SEGMENT OVERVIEW

Resilient Cultivators,

by the numbers

Like Marion, Resilient Cultivators are mostly low-income, rural, married women with limited education who are mostly farmers. Approximately 7.4 million (25% of the Kenyan population) fall in this segment. 

GENDER (FEMALE)

72%

53%

AGE (25-44)

64%

58%

SOCIOECONOMIC (SES 1-2)

51%

40%

Resilient Cultivators

Kenya Average

HIGH INCOME VOLATILITY

49%

55%

Because their income volatility is somewhat high, they work to smooth it out over the course of the week. They have confidence in their ability to pay their household bills, despite facing similar challenges with bills and similar emergencies to Kenyans as a whole. Their strong planning likely supports this confidence.

Financial Behavior & Attitudes

SAVINGS BEHAVIOR & ATTITUDES

The vast majority are frequent but moderately deliberate savers.

SAVINGS ACCOUNTS

They have mobile money accounts but use them primarily for sending and receiving money. About two-thirds participate in financial group channels, and those that do most frequently use of them for saving—as do the third of the segment that hold accounts with formal financial institutions.

BORROWING BEHAVIOR & ATTITUDES

They are also very likely to borrow, but don’t do so frequently. Family is their most likely source of a loan.

BORROWING ACCOUNTS

Those using groups, friends, or mobile money to borrow do so more frequently.

Resilient Cultivators

Nigeria Average

Explore our complete set of findings:

 

DESIGN OPPORTUNITIES

How might we create products and services

for Resilient Cultivators that...

Bring in

Social Features

Make mobile-based saving and borrowing more of a community-minded endeavor to hold greater segment appeal

Digitize

Existing Tools

Leverage their high mobile penetration, while overcoming some of the barriers they currently see in using mobile wallets, savings, and credit-building

Offer Alternatives to Traditional Loans

Provide alternative options to traditional collateral so that they use credit tools more frequently without compromising their risk-averse planning tendencies

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 The Human Account is led, created and developed by Dalberg with Rockefeller Philanthropy Advisors, and funded by the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation.

 

Local partners are Lagos Business School in Nigeria, Ashoka University in India, not-for-profit development finance company, Karandaaz in Pakistan, and research and advisory firm, Busara Center for Behavioral Economics in Kenya.