The Human Account is led, created and developed by Dalberg with Rockefeller Philanthropy Advisors, and funded by the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation.

 

Local partners are Lagos Business School in Nigeria, Ashoka University in India, not-for-profit development finance company, Karandaaz in Pakistan, and research and advisory firm, Busara Center for Behavioral Economics in Kenya.

Questioning Cultivators

12% of Nigeria | 13 million people

self-confident, steadfast, skeptical

Click below to learn more:

Watch Chigozie's

Short Documentary

CHIGOZIE'S STORY

Meet Chigozie

 

"There are so many people in my village I have to help, but I can’t always provide support and that pains me."

Chigozie is a 50 year old man from Anambra. He is married and though he doesn’t have any children, he financially supports other people in his family. Chigozie did not finish primary school, but instead received vocational training in masonry. His wife has a college degree and until recently worked as a teacher. Together they earn a living by farming three plots of land they rent in their village, a skill Chigozie learned as a child. They dream of one day conceiving a child and building their own house. However, a few years ago, Chigozie got into a motorbike accident that resulted in the depletion of his savings and severe injuries that now limit his ability to work. Though this incident led to a major financial setback, he has still been able to meet his regular expenses.

How has Chigozie managed to remain financially solvent after sustaining a

major financial emergency?

 

SEGMENT OVERVIEW

 

Questioning Cultivators,

by the numbers

Like Chigozie, Questioning Cultivators are predominantly middle aged, rural, married men with below average education and primary household decision-making power. Approximately 13 million people (12% of the Nigerian population) fall in this segment and are mostly from rural backgrounds.

Questioning Cultivators

Nigeria Average

GENDER (MALE)

65%

49%

AGE (18-34)

42%

62%

SOCIOECONOMIC (SES 1-3)

74%

60%

HIGH INCOME VOLATILITY

48%

54%

Most Questioning Cultivators are among the lowest income segments in Nigeria, with the lowest levels of education and technology use. Their financial health is mixed. While they manage income volatility, build reserves, and cultivate receivables more effectively than their peers, they are the weakest planners and struggle more than the average Nigerian to cover expenses.

Financial Behavior & Attitudes

SAVINGS BEHAVIOR & ATTITUDES

Their frequent saving, robust use of informal financial groups, and high rates of land and livestock ownership strengthen their financial resilience. Across all segments, they are the most likely to believe that they earn enough to save

SAVINGS ACCOUNTS

They primarily manage their money through family, financial groups, and friends. They are by far the most robust users of informal group savings in Nigeria, though a significant minority save through formal accounts or mobile wallets

BORROWING BEHAVIOR & ATTITUDES

Three-quarters of Questioning Cultivators borrow frequently at rates above average in Nigeria. Despite this, they do not consider themselves to be highly dependable or comfortable holding debt, though their relatively strong social ties and willingness to share with others helps them build goodwill among their community. 

BORROWING ACCOUNTS

Most participate in informal group borrowing with family and friends. Just one in eight Questioning Cultivators has ever borrowed through a mobile money account or from a formal provider.

Questioning Cultivators

Nigeria Average

Explore our complete set of findings:

 

DESIGN OPPORTUNITIES

How might we create products and services for Questioning Cultivators that...

Leverage their Financial Dependence on Social Channels

Develop group based insurance products that integrate social components

Highlight their

Role as Primary Decision Makers

Use messaging language that primes their strong sense of control and efficacy

Offer a Variety

of Flexible Savings Options

Remove deposit minimums

and fixed time frames to accommodate for their lack of goal-oriented savings strategies

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